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Healthy Butternut Squash Soup

Clear glass cups filled with butternut squash soup

We’re reminded daily that it’s still cold and flu season, so I thought it appropriate to share my healthy butternut squash soup recipe. It’s super quick and easy to prepare. Since this is a low calorie soup, everyone will probably want two bowls. Consider serving it with a salad and healthy almond flour crackers such as Simple Mills brand.

I gave this warming soup an anti-inflammatory “flavor” by adding ingredients commonly known to reduce inflammation, ingredients that also pair well with beta-carotene rich butternut squash and carrots. Healthy and delicious – such a winning combination! The creamed coconut (or coconut cream) makes this recipe tastefully decadent but can be eliminated for a delicious low-fat version.


Method Overview

  • Prepare vegetables
  • Add most of ingredients to pot
  • Simmer for about 20 minutes
  • Puree soup, then add lemon and garnish

Pureeing butternut squash soup with immersion blender.

No Immersion Blender? No Problem.

If you don’t have an immersion blender, you can use a full-size regular blender; however, follow these three steps so you don’t end up with hot soup exploding everywhere.

  • Cool the soup down a bit.
  • Fill the jar no more than halfway.
  • Remove the blender lid’s center insert and hold a kitchen towel over the top.

Now you are ready to blend. Do not try to blend this soup using a bullet blender.

Clear glass cups filled with butternut squash soup
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Healthy Butternut Squash Soup

Course: main course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: corn-free, gluten-free, grain-free, nut-fee, oil-free, plant based, soy-free, vegan, wheat-free, yeast-free
Servings: 8 servings
Calories: 93kcal

Equipment

  • soup pot
  • immersion blender or full-sized regular blender

Ingredients

  • 1 large butternut squash, about 4 pounds, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 3 medium carrots, cut into 1/4-inch-thick full moons
  • 1 medium sweet red apple, peeled, cored, and diced
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 Tablespoons peeled and diced fresh ginger root
  • 2 Tablespoons peeled and diced fresh turmeric root, or 2 teaspoons turmeric powder
  • 4 garlic cloves, quartered
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon sweet or hot paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon Himalayan sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 ounces (2 Tablespoons) creamed coconut, optional, such as Let's Do Organic brand
  • 1 to 2 Tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • Paprika, for garnish

Instructions

  • Put all of the ingredients except for the creamed coconut, lemon juice, and paprika for garnish into a soup pot; add just enough water to cover.
  • When the water starts to boil, reduce the heat and simmer, mostly covered, for 20 minutes or until the squash is fork-tender. Stir occasionally and adjust the heat, if necessary, to keep at a simmer.
  • Add the creamed coconut; it will soften after a few minutes.
  • Remove from the heat and blend well using an immersion blender.
  • Stir in the lemon juice. Taste and add more cinnamon, nutmeg, or salt if desired.
  • Ladle the soup into bowls and lightly sprinkle with paprika.

Notes

The creamed coconut (which comes in a box) can be replaced with 1/4 to 1/2 cup of unsweetened canned coconut cream, such as Native Forest brand.
Garnish with pan-toasted pumpkin seeds if desired.

Nutrition

Calories: 93kcal | Carbohydrates: 20g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 2g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 128mg | Potassium: 515mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 6g | Vitamin A: 13830IU | Vitamin C: 25mg | Calcium: 63mg | Iron: 2mg

My husband grows many varieties of winter squash including this heirloom variety, Galeux d’Eysines squash (AKA French warty squash). It’s milder than butternut but is still delicious; I’ve successfully used it in this soup recipe. An unusual heirloom variety of squash like this probably won’t be available at the market. Like with many heirloom varieties, if you want to experience it you’ll have to grow it yourself from seeds. I explain more about this concept in another post, It’s Time to Plan Your Garden and Buy Seeds.

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