Menu

Research Supporting a Plant-Based Diet for Cardiovascular Health

Assortment of vegetables and fruits

Click orange links to open studies


Our study shows that long‐term consumption of a nutritionally rich plant‐centered diet is associated with a lower risk of Cardiovascular Disease.

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION, 2019

Consumption of vegetarian diets, particularly vegan diets, is associated with lower levels of plasma lipids, which could offer individuals and healthcare professionals an effective option for reducing the risk of heart disease or other chronic conditions.

NUTRITION REVIEW, 2017

Considerable evidence supports the cardiovascular benefits of healthful plant-based diets, and these diets and their constituent foods are getting increasing recognition in dietary recommendations.

TRENDS IN CARDIOVASCULAR MEDICINE, 2018

A wide spectrum of plant-based diets can be nutritionally adequate and confer cardiovascular benefits, as long as they are planned appropriately and include high-quality foods.

CURRENT ATHEROSCLEROSIS REPORTS, 2019

A healthy plant-based diet is associated with lower blood pressure while an unhealthy plant-based diet is adversely related to blood pressure. Plant-based diets rich in vegetables and whole grains and limited in refined grains, sugar-sweetened beverages, and total meat may contribute to these associations. In addition to current guidelines, the nutritional quality of consumed plant foods is as important as limiting animal-based components.

BMJ NUTRITION MEDICINE & HEALTH, 2020

The Plant‐Based Dietary Portfolio combines established cholesterol‐lowering foods (plant protein, nuts, viscous fiber, and phytosterols), plus monounsaturated fat, and has been shown to improve low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol and other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors.

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION, 2021

“Plant-based diets with limited animal products lower both systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, across sex and BMI.”

Journal of Hypertension, 2021

“In summary, current palliative cardiovascular medicine consisting of drugs, stents, and bypass surgery cannot cure or halt the vascular disease epidemic and is financially unsustainable. Whole-food plant-based (WFPB) can restore the ability of endothelial cells to produce nitric oxide, which can halt and reverse disease without morbidity, mortality, or added expense. As powerful as the data are, it is unconscionable not to inform the cardiovascular disease patient of this option for disease resolution. To begin to eliminate chronic illness, the public needs to be made aware that a pathway to this goal is through whole-food plant-based nutrition (WFPBN).”

Journal of Geriatric Cardiology, 2017

“7 Countries Study showed that animal food groups, with the exception of fish, were strongly positively related to 25-year chronic heart disease mortality and that plant food, with the exception of potatoes, were inversely related. Of the individual foods, butter, hard margarines and meat were most strongly related to chronic heart disease mortality rates.”

7 Countries Study, began in 1957 with 25 year and 50 year results

“The coronary arteries of 300 soldiers killed in action were dissected (during Korean war). The average age of the men in this group was approximately 22.1 years. In 77.3% of the cases, some gross evidence of coronary disease was demonstrated that varied from “fibrous” thickening to complete occlusion of one or more of the main branches.”

Journal of the American Medical Association, 1953

Consumption of a plant‐centered, high‐quality diet starting in young adulthood is associated with a lower risk of CVD by middle age.

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION, 2021

“Atherosclerosis begins in youth. Fatty streaks and clinically significant raised lesions increase rapidly in prevalence and extent during the 15 to 34 year age span. Primary prevention of atherosclerosis, must begin in childhood or adolescence.”

American Medical Association, 1999

“A whole-food plant-based diet helped reversed angina without medical or invasive therapy. It appears prudent that this type of lifestyle be among the first recommendations for patients with atherosclerosis.”

Case Reports in cardiology, 2015

“Increased long-term intake of lignans was associated with a significantly lower risk of total coronary heart disease (CHD) in both men and women. Lignans are polyphenolic substances that are produced by plant cells.”

Journal of the American college of cardiology, 2021

“Reduction in dietary fat with corresponding increase in vegetables, fruit, and grains led to benefits related to breast cancer, coronary heart disease, and diabetes, without adverse effects, among healthy postmenopausal US women.”

The Journal of Nutrition, 2019